Excerpts

By , October 24, 2009

From Chapter 1 – Searching for God:

Doris at age 16.

Doris at age 16.

“Living in a primitive culture; cursed by witch doctors; threatened with stonings; isolated from the comforts and conveniences of civilization, including medical care; enduring strange food and terrible loneliness; painful separations from loved ones; near death experiences; and imprisonment – these were experiences far from my wildest imagination as I was growing up in a small coal region town in Pennsylvania; I could never have dreamed what my future held.”

From Chapter 4 – Adventuring into the Unknown:

Chapters 4, 5.  Our first-born.  Larry Allen was 9 months old when we first entered the tribe to live. Larry is sitting in the "Baby Pride", which served as a table for all three of us.

Now I had a baby to consider

“Our hearts were bubbling over with excitement. The time had come for us to be allocated to our place of service. Larry had flown back to scout the region. How desperately these Indians needed Christ. God was moving in Larry’s heart. When he returned from Mecatlan, his enthusiasm was high, but as he described the filthy, desolate condition of the village and the complexity of getting there, my heart was troubled. There were no doctors, no roads or highways, and there was a malaria epidemic in the region that had taken many children’s lives. We had no place to live. The small aircraft service into this region was unreliable; the pilots frequently crashed, killing themselves and their passengers. The only other way into the village was a fourteen hour journey over steep, rugged trails. This report brought an unsettling fear. I had surrendered my all to the Lord many years ago, saying, ‘I’ll go where You want me to go, dear Lord; I’ll do what You want me to do,’ but that commitment was for me – now I had a baby to consider.”

From Chapter 4 – Adventuring into the Unknown:

Typical Indian hut.

Typical Indian hut.

“It did not take long to discover that we three were not the only ones living in the hut.  Sharing our space were bugs and crawling rodents of countless varieties.  In an effort to keep warm, Larry purchased from the village store old newspapers that had been brought in from the highway. Making a paste with flour and water, we wallpapered our hut.  Thrilled with our accomplishment, we looked forward to going to bed that night.  Our abode now felt cozier with most of the wind being kept outside.  Turning on our gasoline lamp, we wrapped ourselves in blankets and prepared for a warm night’s sleep.  Suddenly, we heard the scurrying sound of what seemed to be millions of tiny feet.  Larry turned on the flashlight to reveal our walls covered with hugh cockroaches feasting on the glue mixture.  We decided not to disturb their fiesta, but quickly moved our army cots to the middle of the room.  Could we sleep with all this partying going on around us?  We decided to try.  No sooner had I fallen asleep when Larry called out, ‘Doris, turn on the flashlight.  Something fell from the roof onto my chest and I don”t know what it is; it could be a snake!”

From Chapter 5 – New Quarters, New Light:

Lupe and Maria

Lupe and Maria

“One morning dona Maria came running to warn us that we must leave the village. She cried, ‘Last night in the center of town, a man by the name of Fernando claimed he was going to kill all three of you, the baby included.’ Terror was written across her face. In an effort to calm her and reassure ourselves, we said, ‘But he was drunk. Surely he did not mean to carry through with this threat.’ ‘Oh yes!’ dona Maria exclaimed. He has murdered before, and in order not to lose face with his friends, he will do this!’ Larry looked at me and then the baby with concern in his eyes. He said quietly, ‘dona Maria, we will have to pray about this.”

Chapter 15 – His Eye is on the Sparrow

The Sparow

The Sparow

“After prayer, we boarded our small plane we named ‘the Sparrow’ and took off into the blue. It was a beautiful, cloudless day. All was calm. In the back seat our three children were happily reading their books. It was one of those days when it felt great to be in the air and feel so close to heaven.”

“At about three o’clock in the afternoon, the wind changed course. A haze in the sky and the western sun beating down on our windshield caused poor visibility. We lost radio contact. Suddenly we realized we were lost! Straining our eyes to find some landmark that would indicate our position, we could see no towns, highways, railroads, or lakes to show us where we were. Gas was getting low – one tank was empty. The other tank was going down quickly, with only about five gallons left. As we watched the gas gauge drop at a rapid pace, the children were also aware of our imminent danger.”

Chapter 16 – In the Realms of Darkness

Most famous local witch doctor, Maria de Jesus

Most famous local witch doctor, Maria de Jesus

“While forces of evil were all around us, the countless times we had witnessed God’s awesome power reassured our hearts that Satan was no match for the King of kings. The most famous of numerous witch doctors in Mecatlan was a woman named Maria de Jesus. People came from near and far to obtain the services of this woman of darkness. Practicing black magic, Maria was adept at putting curses on people to cause their death.

I felt a deep compassion for her because I knew Jesus loved her and could break the power of Satan. One day I asked dona Lupe if she would accompany me to visit Maria de Jesus. When we arrived at her home and spoke a word of greeting, a young Indian girl appeared at the door. She invited us inside. As we entered the outer room, an overwhelmingly oppressive heaviness filled the atmosphere. I had never before felt such evil. I began to question the wisdom of my decision in coming to this place.”

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